SHORT COMMUNICATION


https://doi.org/10.5005/jp-journals-11009-0152
Annals of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Hepatology ISPGHAN
Volume 6 | Issue 1 | Year 2024

Urgent Need for “Green Endoscopy” in Routine Practice in India


Ankit Agrawal

Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Corresponding Author: Ankit Agrawal, Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Sanjay Gandhi Postgraduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India, Phone: +91 8839176921, e-mail: ankitagrawal456798@gmail.com

Received: 28 January 2024; Accepted: 01 March 2024; Published on: 10 April 2024

How to cite this article Agrawal A. Urgent Need for “Green Endoscopy” in Routine Practice in India. Ann Pediatr Gastroenterol Hepatol 2024;6(1):3–4.

Source of support: Nil

Conflict of interest: None

INTRODUCTION

Green endoscopy revolves around the incorporation of environmentally friendly measures throughout the entire endoscopic process. This encompasses all steps from energy-efficient equipment to waste reduction strategies and sustainable material choices. The aim is to minimize the carbon footprint of endoscopy procedures while ensuring the safety and well-being of young patients.1 This paradigm shift promotes eco-conscious practices within endoscopic procedures.

WHY THIS CONCEPT OF GREEN ENDOSCOPY IS GAINING IMPORTANCE?

In the recent United Nations Climate Change (December 2023), India pledged to transition out of fossil fuel and reduce its carbon footprint. Healthcare accounts for 4.4% of the global carbon footprint. The gastrointestinal (GI) endoscopy is the third-highest waste generator in healthcare facilities due to the production of large-volume nonrenewable waste and reprocessing or decontamination processes. So that at each and every step, we have a high carbon footprint in our activities. A recent study revealed that each endoscopy generates 2.1 kg of disposable waste going to the landfill (64%) and creating biohazard (28%). Only 9% was recyclable waste.2

HOW TO IMPLEMENT GREEN ENDOSCOPY PRACTICE?

CONCLUSION

Green endoscopy is a “practice of conscience” and is now a necessity. We, as endoscopists, must act rapidly, contribute to the reduction of carbon footprint, and make the earth a sustainable habitat for our children.

Strategy Environmental impact Opinion
Energy-efficient equipment Reduction in energy consumption during endoscopic procedures Emphasizes the importance of minimizing carbon footprint while maintaining patient safety
Waste reduction strategies Decreased generation of waste through proper sterilization and reuse of equipment Supports the integration of waste reduction measures to minimize environmental impact
Sustainable material choices Selection of eco-friendly materials for endoscopic tools, supplies, and packaging Advocates for the use of sustainable materials to promote environmental sustainability
Recycling and proper disposal Implementation of protocols for recycling and environmentally responsible waste disposal Stresses the importance of responsible waste management to reduce environmental harm
Education and awareness Training and raising awareness among healthcare professionals about green practices Highlights the need for education and awareness to foster a culture of sustainability
Recycling and proper disposal Implementation of protocols for recycling and environmentally responsible waste disposal Stresses the importance of responsible waste management to reduce environmental harm
Education and awareness Training and raising awareness among healthcare professionals about green practices Highlights the need for education and awareness to foster a culture of sustainability

FUTURE DIRECTION

REFERENCES

1. Maurice JB, Siau K, Sebastian S, et al. Green Endoscopy Network. Green endoscopy: a call for sustainability in the midst of COVID-19. Lancet Gastroenterol Hepatol 2020;5(7):636–638. DOI: 10.1016/S2468-1253(20)30157-6

2. Vaccari M, Tudor T, Perteghella A. Costs associated with the management of waste from healthcare facilities: an analysis at national and site level. Waste Manag Res 2018;36(1):39–47. DOI: 10.1177/0734242X17739968

3. Sebastian S, Dhar A, Baddeley R, et al. Green endoscopy: British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG), Joint Accreditation Group (JAG) and Centre for Sustainable Health (CSH) joint consensus on practical measures for environmental sustainability in endoscopy. Gut 2023;72(1):12–26. DOI: 10.1136/gutjnl-2022-328460

4. Rodríguez de Santiago E, Dinis-Ribeiro M, Pohl H, et al. Reducing the environmental footprint of gastrointestinal endoscopy: European Society of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ESGE) and European Society of Gastroenterology and Endoscopy Nurses and Associates (ESGENA) position statement. Endoscopy 2022;54(8):797–826. DOI: 10.1055/a-1859-3726

5. Rizan C, Reed M, Bhutta MF. Environmental impact of personal protective equipment distributed for use by health and social care services in England in the first six months of the COVID-19 pandemic. J R Soc Med 2021;114(5):250–263. DOI: 10.1177/01410768211001583

6. Agrawal D, Shoup V, Montgomery A, et al. Disposal of endoscopic accessories after use: do we know and do we care? Gastroenterol Nurs 2017;40(1):13–18. DOI: 10.1097/SGA.0000000000000280

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© The Author(s). 2024 Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and non-commercial reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.